Monday, April 10, 2017

Thinking Out of the Box With Railway Photography

Myself, and a few friends had a conversation recently about the way we compose our shots. Mainly we spoke about lighting, framing, and editing.

That conversation got me thinking about writing this post, and how I compose my own shots. In the next few paragraphs I will try my best to explain how I think about, and execute my photos.


Lighting

Lighting plays a huge role in the way your photos will turn out. When it comes to shooting trains, this one element can be difficult to get just right due to a number of factors, such as which direction a train is running, partly cloudy days where the sun is constantly in and out from behind the clouds, and back-lighting, among many other things.

Before picking a spot to shoot I will always try to think about where the sun would be if it were to come out. For example, if I'm planning to be out during the morning hours I try to find a spot that is good for eastbound trains, and shoot from the same side of the tracks as the sun. This way the sun lights up the entirety of any trains that may come along. Standing on the same side as the sun also means that if a westbound train does come rolling through, I have eliminated (for the most part) the threat of back-lighting.

The below shot is an example of a day where the clouds were constantly blocking the sun, but got out of the way just as a train approached. Had I not been thinking about where the sun was when choosing a spot, this shot may not have turned out as well as it did.



Sometimes you can't avoid back-lighting, and that's okay. Properly exposing, and doing some editing later can save those shots.

Take a look at the below picture. It is of the Canadian Pacific Holiday Train rolling north on the Leduc Subdivision. As you can see the sun is directly behind the train, but I've managed to save the image. I achieved this by shooting in manual, taking a number of practice shots until I found an exposure in which the foreground was properly lit. and then later editing the image in Lightroom.

You might ask "well what editing did you do?" and I would explain that aside from the average stuff, all I really did was deeply reduce the highlights and bring up the shadows and saturation.

Steve Boyko has a decent write up on what he does, and for the most part it is the same for me. Read his steps here.





Framing

When it comes to shooting trains, you may find yourself constantly shooting from the same angles over and over and over. I found myself doing this, and started to get bored. Instead of giving up the hobby, I tried to reinvent the way I shoot/frame my pictures. In doing so, I find myself enjoying the challenge of trying to find something different. I try to avoid the over shot areas, but if I can't I'm looking for a way to shoot it in a different way.

For example, in October I found myself in Florida at the Plant City viewing platform. If you look up photos from the location the majority are all from the same angles.

Upon arrival I explored around a bit, and found myself hoping for train to come along from the east to get a shot through the window on the lower level. The below train did not come from that direction, but had the locomotive pushing on the end, as they were reversing to service some businesses in the area.

Simply shooting through the window, and framing the train properly gave the photo that difference that I always hope to find.



Editing

When it comes to editing, it always comes down to what I personally think looks best. Everyone has their own style of editing. For myself, it is always about getting the colours to look proper by adjusting exposure, contrast, saturation, highlights, shadows, and a few others. Sounds easy enough, but sometimes it takes playing around with a number of different things to get that look.

I also try to put the train info, location, and date on the photo itself. I do this so that anyone viewing my pictures doesn't have to do a lot of searching to find out those things. A personal pet peeve is when there is little to no info given on a post. Put a little effort into your post, and give a description so that others know what they are looking at.



Having said all of this, I hope that others will take the time to develop their own styles. Think outside the box, and have fun. That is what it is all about.


Thanks for reading,

David Gray - Going Trackside

Thursday, January 26, 2017

First Day Trackside in 2017

First of all, happy new year to all of the readers here. Hope everyone had a great 2016, and here is to an amazing 2017

January 7 brought my first day trackside in 2017, and it didn't disappoint.

The day started as may others do for me, by dropping of the girlfriend at work in Spruce Grove. Today was a 9-5 shift for her, providing lots of time for me to be out. So, I decided to head west towards Wildwood, and explore a few locations I had spotted on Google Earth. 

The first stop was the Lobstick s-curve which is just east of Wildwood. I liked the look of this spot because the road crosses right in the middle of the s-curve, providing a curve shot in either direction.

The Lobstick S-Curve Crossing

Shortly after arriving here, I heard over the scanner that an eastbound would be coming soon. I quickly set up on the north side of the crossing, and before long CN 304 came speeding by.



Not a bad shot at all!

The opposite direction provided a nice going away angle as well.



304 would be meeting 105 at Evansburg, so I decided to relocate quickly into Wildwood itself.

Before long 105 came rolling into Wildwood with 2930 leading the way. The below shot would have turned out better had it been properly focused, but you can't win 'em all!



After 105, I knew there would be a bit of a break between trains, as they would likely have to do a meet at Leaman.

Taking this into consideration, I moved west and found another curve to shoot at Granada. This crossing is a few miles west of Wildwood.



Before long, I heard a horn in the distance, and CN 302 came around the corner with 2902 leading 2874. 



After 302 rolled by, it was time to start heading east again.

As I did so, I heard 302 meeting 119 at Evansburg. Knowing 119 wouldn't be long, I decided to try a shot of them with Chip Lake in the background.



Not bad, but would be better for an eastbound in the summer. I'll take it though.

It was a bit of a break between trains, as 111 was out there somewhere with engine troubles. I returned to the Lobstick location to wait.

About 30-40 minutes later 111 finally showed up with 2679 leading the long stacker.



Another nice curve shot for the day.

After 111 had passed, I received word from a friend that 843 would be coming shortly with 5412 leading the way. So I decided to stick around for them.

I waited, and waited.... finally a horn in the distance! But... from the wrong direction.

Turned out that 111 had a meet with 310 at Leaman. I quickly adjusted for a different angle, producing the below shot.



2100 leading! Nice!

They would be meeting 843 at Evansburg, so again I waited.

Finally 843 began blowing for the crossing east of me, and before long they were right there with a nice surprise trailing unit.






Definitely worth the wait.

After that I decided to head for home, but in doing so got ahead of 310 again. "Might as well shot them again" I said to myself.

I got to the Gainford and set up by the trestle, producing this shot.



You'll notice the burnt side of IC 2704 in this shot.

The final shot of the day came at Carvel as 310 once again rolled by.



As it began to get darker, that was it. Time to pick up Lauren from work.

Hope you enjoyed the journey. More to come this year.